A prolonged storm is causing flood alerts and electricity blackouts in Tompkins County

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By theusabulletin.com

The prolonged storm that has hit Tompkins County has caused significant damage and disruption. The strong winds and heavy rain on Wednesday morning have resulted in numerous fallen trees and blocked roads throughout the area. As a result, flood warnings have been issued, and residents are being urged to exercise caution when traveling due to debris on local roads.
Currently, a flood watch is in effect until Friday morning, indicating that more precipitation is expected in the coming days. This has raised concerns about runoff from bodies of water, including smaller ones like creeks. The forecast for the rest of the day includes about an inch of rain and the possibility of up to an inch of snow, accompanied by wind gusts of up to 30 mph. Earlier in the day, wind speeds reached up to 50 mph in Groton.
The storm has also caused widespread power outages in Tompkins County. Approximately 5,700 customers are currently without power, out of a total of about 48,000 customers. The majority of the affected customers are in Danby and Newfield. In addition to the inconvenience caused by the power outages, lights and gates at railroad crossings in Danby, West Danby, and Newfield have been affected, and traffic lights in various locations throughout the county are also out.
Reports from different areas within the county indicate the extent of the damage caused by the storm. Trumansburg has experienced a fallen tree on McLallen and Washington Streets, while Slaterville residents have reported a tree blocking Creamery Road. Debris has also been reported on roads in Trumansburg, Caroline, Groton, McLean, Etna, Dryden, Freeville, and Lansing.
As temperatures drop in the area, the forecast predicts a change to snow on Wednesday night. This adds another layer of concern for residents and emergency response teams who are already dealing with the aftermath of the storm.
Geoff Dunn, the Public Information Officer for the Tompkins County Department of Emergency Response, has provided guidance for residents. He advises treating intersections without stoplights as four-way stops to ensure safe passage. With the flood watch in effect and the potential for further precipitation, residents are urged to stay informed and take necessary precautions to protect themselves and their property.

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